MEDIA MATTERS
THREE WOMEN OF COLOR BECOME PART OF CHARLIE ROSE STORY
<b>THREE WOMEN OF COLOR BECOME PART OF CHARLIE ROSE STORY</b>
"EXECUTIVE TV PRODUCER YVETTE VEGA, ONE OF CHARLIE ROSE'S ALLEGED ACCUSERS SPEAKS OUT."
By: Richard Prince, "Journal-isms"
N2Entertainment.net

At least three women of color have been part of the story of Charlie Rose’s recent downfall at CBS, PBS and Bloomberg News over sexual harassment allegations.

Video clips were played repeatedly of Gayle King, Rose’s African American co-anchor on “CBS This Morning,” after the Washington Post reported that eight women told the Post that Rose made unwanted sexual advances toward them.

“I never in a million years thought that we, Charlie Rose, CBS would be involved in this story in this way,” King said Wednesday, anchoring with Norah O’Donnell but without Rose. “But I also think we’re not shy about reporting it. I think that’s important.”

Yvette Vega, (pictured) whom colleagues described as Puerto Rican, was Rose’s longtime executive producer. Kyle Godfrey-Ryan, one of Rose’s assistants in the mid-2000s, told the Post that she had complained about Rose to Vega.

“‘I explained how he inappropriately spoke to me during those times,’ Godfrey-Ryan said. ‘She would just shrug and just say, “That’s just Charlie being Charlie.”

“In a statement to The Post, Vega said she should have done more to protect the young women on the show.
“I should have stood up for them,” said Vega, 52, who has worked with Rose since the show was created in 1991. ‘I failed. It is crushing. I deeply regret not helping them. ‘ . . . .”

Another black journalist, Rebecca Carroll, a former producer for Rose’s canceled PBS show, said that racism and sexism were “inherent” to the behind-the-scenes atmosphere at the show, John Bowden reported for the Hill.

Carroll, editor for special projects at WNYC radio in New York, “tweeted Wednesday evening that Rose would regularly belittle her and that she was punished for speaking out about ‘casual racism’ at the show.

”‘As a young black woman starting out as a producer for the prestigious Charlie Rose show, I had to gauge every day whether to respond to casual racism or sexually predatory behavior,’ Carroll tweeted.

” ‘I spoke out about racialized or micro-aggressive racism and was punished for it. The predatory behavior was ignored or accepted or laughed off — it was inherent to our daily culture,’ she continued.

“Carroll said in subsequent tweets that she never believed that Rose treated African-Americans as his equals. . . .”
Carroll told Journal-isms by email that she planned to write her own thoughts for NBC’s new opinion vertical, NBC Think.

“It’s a piece on the broader view, which is to say, what constitutes actual change and/or consequences when the behavior is systemically sanctioned? These high-profile, powerful white men should absolutely lose their jobs, but what kind of a loss or consequence is it if you’re in your late 70s and don’t actually need a job? And we’re still centering on white men, because the media only ever sees any significant shift in cultural behavior through a white lens.”

EDITOR'S NOTE: Washington Post journalist Richard Prince occasionally submits his column "Journal-isms" to "Media Matters." To check out Prince's complete "Journalism's" columns log on to: http://journal-isms.com/.